Good resources to learn about emacs-lisp?

I have been using Emacs for about 10 years but never took serious time to learn emacs-lisp. Even though my .emacs folder has 100+ .el files, they’re mostly configuration for different modes.

Now with my more and more enthusiasm with clojure, some tools like lispy (https://github.com/abo-abo/lispy) proves to be very powerful. However, when I want to tweak it, it starts to feel challenging due to my unfamiliarity with elisp.

So , I wonder if there is good recommended resources to learn emacs-lisp, other than the official docs? So far I found https://github.com/jtmoulia/elisp-koans pretty interesting.

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On my harddrive I have both of the elisp books produced by the FSF, which are with other resources available at https://www.emacswiki.org/emacs/EmacsLisp. I’ve never gotten around to reading them (I have over 2000 pages of official emacs, orgmode, and gnus pdf documentation on my docket). After years of working in emacs, I’ve learned most of what I know by tinkering and by drawing comparisons from Clojure and Common Lisp.

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i know that some time ago, cs students at MIT were taught about programming… using emacs and lisp ( scheme )… now… this has changed… hmm… i may be mistaken, but i believe that they are using python these days as the main language for their programming intro course… also they have stopped teaching emacs… also the main intro text is no longer SICP…

…well… in any case… i personally think that it would have been better to stick with lisp and emacs… also i believe that it would be better not to provide students with something like the dr-racket editor… because… yes,… it does take some time to learn about emacs… but that effort is well spend,…i think… since emacs can become a life-long ally…

…my conclusion is therefore, that the best way to teach newcomers about programming is by making use of emacs and elisp… so that is exactly what i did!.. now judging from your post you will probably find my videos… well… somewhat slow-paced… since they are targeted towards beginners…

anyway… here is the link to a more advanced video in which i am talking about advising elisp functions… https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EqiWCKfB-KU&list=PLFE5V2VWUSDTy6BQB69lvtiBf-SUcx0lJ&index=106 … perhaps this can give you an idea of what sort of things i do cover in my videos… and whether or not this sort of information could be of help to you…

edit: yesterday i was trying to think of / point out a video / topic, which i thought would be reasonably advanced / interesting… but today i realized that i have also talked about the elisp obarray: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0iA7R_SQV84… so in this video i try to explain… well basically how symbols work in emacs / elisp… also… hmm… if i remember correctly i even went so far as to mention something about the hashing implementation details… hmmm… perhaps not :smile:… the point is… as far as my elisp-videos are concerned… this is really as advanced as it gets :smile: … so perhaps… hmm… perhaps it would make more sense to check out this video instead…